The New Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting

Project Description:

“The New Transparency makes visible the identities of individuals, workings of institutions and flows of information in ways never before seen. Surveillance, the social process underlying the New Transparency, is rapidly becoming the dominant organizing practice of our late modern world. Given growing computer-dependence and reliance on personal data collection and processing by a variety of institutions, and heightened public concern about security, surveillance is now experienced as an everyday reality. ”

Funder: MCRI project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Website: http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/the-new-transparency/

Host institution (s): University of Alberta, University of Toronto, University of Victoria, Open University, Queen’s University

ASSERT (Assessing Security Research – Tools and Methodologies to Measure Social Impact)

Project Description:

“The need for considering societal impacts of EU security research has been acknowledged on many occasions by different actors. The problem though is that in traditional thinking, societal impacts are reduced to side effects of instrumental (technological and legal) security measures. This binary thinking has to be overcome. It should and can be demonstrated that societal dimensions of security research taken into account from the very beginning of the “design process” can increase the variety pool of feasible solutions. Starting from a synthesis of state of the art discussions on societal security, we will identify best practice cases exploring and assessing societal impacts of science and technology in the security domain and beyond, and carefully analyse their structural properties. This will be done in a multidisciplinary fashion from different perspectives, including end-users, stakeholders, researchers, policy-makers and NGOs. Bringing together these different perspectives in a series of workshops will create the basis for the development of a tool and a strategy for the sustainable implementation of societal impacts in future EU research activities in the field of security.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://assert-project.eu/

Host institution (s): Generalny Inspektor Ochrony Danych Osobowych (Poland), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, The Information Commissioner (Informacijski pooblaščenec – IP-RS), The Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and Freedom of Information

IRISS (Increasing Resilience in Surveillance Societies)

Project Description:

“IRISS reconstructed the spread of surveillance systems and technologies in public and private sectors from the perspective of their impact on the fabric of a democratic society. The project focused on the observable effects and everyday understanding of surveillance in contemporary Europe, analysed differences within and between individual societies and matched the observable effects against the situation in other parts of the world.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://irissproject.eu/

Host institution (s): Institute for the Sociology of Law and Criminology (Austria), Trilateral Research & Consulting (UK), University of Stirling, University of Edinburgh, Eotvos Karoly Policy Institute (Hungary), Institute of Technology Assessment (Austria), University of Sheffield, University of Hamburg, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Open University, Universitat de Barcelona, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e.V, Peace Research Institute Oslo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Comenius University (Slovakia), Universität der Bundeswehr München

SurPRISE (Surveillance, Privacy and Security)

Project Description:

“SurPRISE re-examined the relationship between security and privacy, which is commonly positioned as a ‘trade-off’. Where security measures and technologies involve the collection of information about citizens, questions arise as to whether and to what extent their privacy has been infringed. This infringement of individual privacy is sometimes seen as an acceptable cost of enhanced security. Similarly, it is assumed that citizens are willing to trade off their privacy for enhanced personal security in different settings. This common understanding of the security-privacy relationship, both at state and citizen level, has informed policymakers, legislative developments and best practice guidelines concerning security developments across the EU.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://surprise-project.eu/

Host institution (s): Institute of Technology Assessment of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Agencia de Protección de Datos de la Comunidad de Madrid, Instituto de Politicas y Bienes Publicos/Agencia Estatal Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, The Danish Board of Technology, European University Institute, Verein für Rechts-und Kriminalsoziologie (Austria), Median Opinion and Market Research Limited Company, The Norwegian Board of Technology, Open University, Centre for Technology Assessment, Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences, Unabhängiges Landeszentrum für Datenschutz

CRISP (Centre for Research into Information, Surveillance and Privacy)

Project Description:

“This report presents an overview of the development of an emerging research agenda, facilitated by the Centre for Research into Information, Surveillance and Privacy (CRISP) and funded by NEMODE +. The agenda explores the theme of how privacy can be designed into organizational processes and technologies. The report is titled ‘Designing Privacy In: Setting the Research Agenda’. It captures the activities initiated by CRISP in order to identify key research issues and sets out a future research agenda. The report is therefore both a record of activity and a statement of research potential.”

Funder: EPSRC NEMODE network +

Website: http://www.nemode.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/CRISP-Privacy-by-Design-30-March-2015.pdf

Host institution (s): University of Stirling, Open University Business School, University of Edinburgh

Taking liberties?: New uses of consumer data in the UK

Project Description:

“Taking Liberties was a three year project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, which aimed to identify whether consumer data collected as part of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) programmes are being used in security measures in two key industries: financial services and travel.”

Funder: The Leverhulme Trust

Website: http://www.open.ac.uk/business-school/research/projects/taking-liberties-new-uses-consumer-data-uk

Host institution (s): Open University

PRISMS (Privacy and Security Mirrors)

Project Description:

“The PRISMS project analyses the traditional trade-off model between privacy and security and works towards a more evidence-based perspective for reconciling privacy and security, trust and concern. It has examined how technologies aimed at enhancing security are subjecting citizens to an increasing amount of surveillance and, in many cases, causing infringements of privacy and fundamental rights. PRISMS conducted both a multi-disciplinary inquiry into the concepts of privacy and security and their relationships and an EU-wide survey to determine whether people evaluate the introduction of security technologies in terms of a trade-off. As a result, PRISMS will determine the factors that affect the public assessment of the security and privacy implications of a given security technology. The project is using these results to devise a decision support system (DSS) providing users (those who deploy and operate security systems) insight into the pros and cons, constraints and limits of specific security investments compared to alternatives taking into account a wider society context.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://prismsproject.eu/

Host institution (s): Fraunhofer ISI, Trilateral Research & Consulting (UK), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, TNO, University of Edinburgh, Eötvös Károly Policy Institute (Hungary), Hogeschool Zuyd, Ipsos MORI

ARCADES (Introducing dAta pRoteCtion AnD privacy issuEs at schoolS in the European Union)

Project Description:

“Data Protection Authorities (DPAs) produce educational materials addressed to children and teens, teachers, as well as parents since there is a great need to educate in the field of data and privacy protection. Furthermore, they work together with other organizations for this purpose. DPAs put educational materials on their websites, as well as disseminate them on the regional level. Unfortunately, this knowledge has been thus far disseminated only “passively”: there are little or no actions to educate children about privacy and data protection. Furthermore, such dissemination is currently limited to national or regional “silos”. Thus, also considering the borderless nature of the internet, there is a need for a common approach at the European level and for the development of common and effective teaching approaches. A unified set of teaching aids might help in this regard as nowadays the youth encounter more and more spying and data collecting devices and other new technology appliances which put the privacy of the most vulnerable–young people–at risk. Therefore, knowledge about effective protection of privacy and personal data is as important as it was never before.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://arcades-project.eu/

Host institution (s): Institute for the Sociology of Law and Criminology (Austria), Hamburg Consult, Trilateral (London), University of Stirling, King’s College London

LiSS (Living in Surveillance Societies)

Project Description:

“The Living in Surveillance Societies (LiSS) COST Action is a European research programme designed to increase and deepen knowledge about living and working in the surveillance age, in order to better understand the consequences and impacts of enhanced surveillance, and subsequently to make recommendations about its future governance and practice. The underlying theme of the programme is that technologically mediated surveillance – the systematic and purposeful attention to the lives of individuals or groups utilising new ICTs – is a ubiquitous feature of modern society, with citizens routinely monitored by a range of sophisticated technologies. Yet, despite these developments relatively little is known about the depth of personal surveillance or how our personal information is used.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://www.liss-cost.eu/liss-home/latest-news/

Host institution (s): University of Stirling

PARIS (PrivAcy pReserving Infrastructure for Surveillance)

Project Description:

“The goal of the project PARIS (PrivAcy pReserving Infrastructure for Surveillance) is to define and demonstrate a methodological approach for the development of a surveillance infrastructure which enforces the right of citizens for privacy, justice and freedom. At the same time, it takes into account the evolving nature of such rights, since aspects that are acceptable today might not be acceptable in the future. It also includes the social and ethical nature of such rights, since the perception of such rights varies over time and in different countries.”

Funder: EU-FP7

Website: http://www.paris-project.org/

Host institution (s): TRIALOG, Austrian Institute of Technology, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, KU Leuven, Interdisciplinary Centre for Law and ICT, Universidad de Malaga, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix de Namur, CRIDS: Le Centre de Recherche Informatique et Droit, Thales Communications & Security, Visual Tools